Tag Archives: food

The Lifetime Stockpile: What You’ll Need To Survive Past The First Year

One of the biggest questions facing anyone who is trying to prepare for disasters is that of time. How long will the crisis last? How long will it take for society to get back to normal? This question drives everyone’s stockpiling efforts — most especially, the decision about how much to stockpile. What do we do if the disaster and its aftermath outlast our stockpile? Wouldn’t that normally put us in the same

How to Build a Smokehouse In Your Backyard (with Pictures)

One of the best and tastiest ways to conserve meat is to smoke it. The meat is delicious, and if you keep it in a cool, dry place, it can last up to a year and sometimes even longer. The system used is pretty simple. You make a fire, and the smoke goes through a long tube or pipe. The smoke will then cool down and reach the meat at the appropriate temperature (85 degrees to 125 degrees Fahrenheit). Here is a step-b

How To Build A 6-Month Food Stockpile On A Super-Strict Budget

Despite what you often see on TV and in the movies, stockpiling food is not only for those with conspiracy theories or living through a zombie apocalypse. It is now a part of life for those of us who are “what if” people or those with very strict budgets. Let’s face it: It’s not easy getting by in today’s economy. If we can save a little money on what we need to live by building a stockpile, then that’s

12 Items You Should Stockpile Other Than Food and Water

We live in very volatile times, times that are marked by increasingly horrific weather events, water scarcity, financial instability and in many cases, civil unrest. What does this mean for us? It means we need to live in a state of preparedness. That doesn’t necessarily translate into being a “hardcore prepper,” but rather just being aware and understanding what it means to be prepared. Of course, when you h

Completely, 100 Percent Off-Grid: 9 Essential Foods You Should Grow

Are you ready to feed your family by what you grow and raise? If you want to reduce your dependency on the commercial food supply, you better start now. It is important to develop a functional homestead capable of producing enough food to live on before you need it. Establishing crops, building infrastructure, raising animals and working out the kinks all takes time, and you may have a few less successful years bef

How long can you REALLY keep your leftovers? Experts reveal how carving meat off the bone, adding salt to your eggs and storing cakes in the freezer could make your meals last months

Chef Travis Harvey advises carving turkey and ham off the bone after dinner  He says slices of meat and poultry can be kept in the freezer for three months  Make prawns last longer by peeling them before storing in the freezer Iced cakes last for three months in the freezer but six months without icing  No matter how hard you try, chances are you’ll still be looking at some leftovers from Christmas dinne

Little House on The Prairie: 5 Must-Haves for Living Off the Grid

There are many reasons why people go off grid. Some individuals seek to be away from the danger of other people in the event of a disaster. Others simply cannot take the stress of the daily grind anymore. Others enjoy braving the elements and seek to prove that they can live off the land. Whatever the reason, it is important to be aware of a few necessities before pulling the plug. Adequate Shelter The first concer

12 Overlooked Items No One Includes In Their Preps (But Should)

No matter how much thought and effort we put into preparing for the unknown, there’s always something we’re likely to forget. We fail to stock up on this, we put off buying that, or we neglect preparing things we think we’ll never use in a disaster situation. Following is a list of things we often overlook when preparing for a natural or man-made disaster – or even a time when the power is simply out for a

4 Lost Thanksgiving Dishes That You Can Recreate at Home

by Mary Kurz The Pilgrims ate venison and wildfowl when they celebrated Thanksgiving. So, if you want to go authentic, leave the spiral-sliced ham at the store. Their meal included other foods like pumpkin, strawberries and beans, too, when they could get them. The meal generally consisted of whatever they were able to grow, hunt or forage for in the wild in this period of the year. Some of the recipes are easy to

How To Plan Farmer’s Calendar All Year Round

A farmer’s work is never done. You’d think that in the winter when there are no crops to tend or hay to mow, there may be some time to take a break, and that’s somewhat true, but not really. Winter is actually one of the busiest times of year; in addition to taking care of the animals, clearing snow, and keeping things running, you need to plan and prep for the next year. Winter appears to be a time of sleep

How To Make Your Cast Iron Skillet Last Forever

What would you choose — a rusty cast iron skillet from a garage sale or a shiny new stainless steel or aluminum pan from a kitchen store? Ignoring the cost difference ($100 vs. a few dollars for a used cast iron skillet), there are many reasons I’d choose a cast iron skillet. First, with some care, cast iron skillets last forever. They evenly heat food and can be used in the oven to finish off a steak or bake

The Cheapest Way To Build A 3-Month Food Stockpile

When I first began to prepare an emergency stockpile, I was dismayed at the cost of emergency food. Freeze-dried food and ready-to-eat meals (MREs) can be expensive for those on a budget – myself included. So how can you quickly build up a stockpile with at least three months of food for you and your family on the cheap? I have done much research into this matter and have been pleasantly surprised at the results

Straw bale gardening: is it any good?

Easy, economical and efficient, the humble straw bale is raising the stakes for veg production Straw bale gardening is not something I’ve tried before, but it is on the cards for this year. The technique has been around since the Sixties, if not earlier. An American horticulturalist, Joel Karsten, has been honing his cultivation techniques using this system for 22 years and now grows almost all his vegetables an