Vegetables That Should Be Planted Next To Each Other!

. A wonderful trio: corn, peas, and pumpkin. The secret of their joint cultivation was known also by American Indians. Corn will support the pea, which saturates the soil with nitrogen. And the pumpkin, in turn, does not allow weeds to grow.

2. Another good combination: onions and carrots. Onion saves carrots from pests, as it releases a substance (allicin), which has an insecticidal and fungicidal effect.

3. Tomatoes and basil are not only a good combination for a salad. These plants need the same soil and the same watering. In addition, the smell of basil is unbearable for caterpillars, often affecting tomatoes. And the harvest of tomatoes will be much tastier if it ripens next to the basil bush.

4. String beans, peppers, and eggplants. Pepper and eggplant, as is known, belong to the same family (nightshade), and they require the same growing conditions. And growing a number of green beans protect the eggplant from the Colorado beetle.

Study Finds ‘Rollie Pollies’ Remove Heavy Metals From Soil, Stabilizing Growing Conditions, Protecting Groundwater

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Turns out a little bug we don’t think of much just so happens to be one of the best protectors of soil ever imaginable. Read on to find out more!

Turn over a brick or a board that has been lying in the yard for a while and underneath you may find a collection of pill bugs scurrying about. Also known as “rollie pollies” or woodlice, these grey-colored creatures can be found in many dark, moist environments feeding on decaying matter. 

What’s interesting about these critters is that they are not bugs at all. They are crustaceans and more closely resemble crabs and shrimp, not insects. They are characterized by their ability to roll up into a ball when they feel threatened.

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Breeding or collecting pill bugs may be an important practice for homesteading and gardening. The guts of these pill bugs contain a number of microbes that help the critter feed on dead, organic matter. By releasing mass quantities of pill bugs into a mature garden, one can be assured that dead plant matter is being properly broken down and returned to healthy soil.
Pillbugs play an important role in the cycle of healthy plant life. They return organic matter to the soil so it can be digested further by fungi, protozoans and bacteria. This process produces a natural supply of nitrates, phosphates and other vital nutrients that plants need to thrive now and in future growing seasons.

One very unique quality that these crustaceans possess is their ability to safely remove heavy metals from soil. For this reason, they are an important tool for cleaning up soil contaminated with pollutants like lead, cadmium and arsenic. In coal spoils and slag heaps, pill bugs come in handy.

They take in heavy metals like lead and cadmium and crystallize these ions in their guts. The heavy metal toxins are then made into spherical deposits in the mid gut. With this special cleanup property, pill bugs survive where most creatures can’t, in the most contaminated sites.

The magic of the pill bugs helps reestablish healthy soil and prevents toxic metal ions from leaching into the groundwater. This means pill bugs are also protecting well water from becoming contaminated while stabilizing soils.
 

This old forgotten secrets helped our parents survive!

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he end result brought us great joy.

“MY SURVIVAL FARM”
…and it’s like nothing you’ve ever seen before… An A to Z guide on survival gardening that is easy to read and a joy to put into practice, full of photos, diagrams and step by step advice. Even a kid can do this and, in fact, I encourage you to let the little ones handle it, to teach them not just about self-reliance but also about how Mother Nature works.

Here is just a glimpse of what you’ll find inside:

How to plan, design and put into action high-yield survival garden that will literally keep you and your family fed for life, no matter what hits you, even when everyone else around you is starving to death. No digging and planting year after year and no daily watering because you’ll have more important things to worry about when TSHTF.

How to set up highly nutritious soil for your plants. Do this before you plant anything and you’re on your way to setting your food forest on auto-pilot for decades to come. I’m gonna tell you this one “weird” thing to add to the mulch that’s not only highly effective but also 100% free (because you already have it in your home right now).

The Lost Ways is a far–reaching book with chapters ranging from simple things like making tasty bark-bread-like people did when there was no food-to building a traditional backyard smokehouse… and many, many, many more!

source :homegardening.

Salvează

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